April 1989 MCU Magazine

General Information

MCUC

This magazine is published monthly for distribution to members of the Memphis Commodore Users Club. It is in no way connected with the Commodore Business Machine Ltd. or Commodore Inc. and Commodore products (CBM, PET, C64, C128, VIC20, Amiga) are registered trademarks of Commodore Inc. The MCUC is a non-profit organization whose purpose is the free exchange of information and knowledge about the use of Commodore computer systems. Memberships are open to anyone: ownership of a computer is not required. Monthly meetings are open to the public and visitors are welcome.

Dues are broken down into three categories. Membership dues may be paid quarterly (3 months) at $6 or annually at $20.00. An associate membership is offered for those living outside a 45 mile radius of Memphis at $10 per year. All memberships are family memberships and dues are not refundable.

Contribution to the MCUC magazine may be in any wordprocessor, preferably saved as a sequential file. You may submit articles on disk, or hardcopy, or upload to the MCUC BBS. Other User Groups are welcome to reprint material from this magazine; we ask only that you give credit to the author and source.

The editor reserves the right to reject material submitted relating to illegal services, products or unethical practices. All material submitted becomes the property of MCUC. The 15th of each month is the DEADLINE FOR ARTICLES.

ADVERTISING RATES

All rates monthly.

Full Page $20.00 1/2 Page $11.00
1/4 Page $7.50 1/8 Page $3.00
Business Card $3.00

Classified to Members Free
All ads must be in by the 15th.
CIRCULATION: 300 copies.

MEETINGS

General Membership Meeting - First Tuesday of each month, 7:00 PM in Fulton Auditorium, State Technical Institute.

Beginner's Class - First Saturday after the first Tuesday. 1:00 PM at the Main Library, Peabody and McClain.

Board of Director's Meeting - Second Thursday after the General Meeting. 7:30 PM State Tech, in the cafeteria.

128, CP/M, MS-DOS SIG - Now meeting the the Memphis FOG group. 4th Tuesday of each month at the Whitestation Library. Copy session at 6 PM, Meeting starts at 7:00 PM.

OFFICERS

President Bob Nunn
759-0461
Vice President Ron Montgomery
767-0737
Secretary Dick Coffman
829-3705
Treasurer Gary Thurman
853-6949
Librarian Jim West
366-5544
Education Bob Earnheart
377-6416
Newsletter Cheryl Nunn
795-0461
BBS 276-6868
Sysop John Blackmer
Co-Sysop Andrew George
367-1266

Disk Order Form

MARCH DISKS

Fill out the order blank below and mail to MCUC, PO Box 34095, Memphis, TN 38134-0095. You may send cash, money order or check payable to Memphis Commodore Users Club. Add $1 postage and handling, 1-3 disks, and an additional $.25 per disk for quantity over 3.

Prices are:
Members: $2/disk, $5/3 disks
Non-members: $3/disk, $6/3 disks
Clubs may obtain disks on a 1 to 1 exhcnage basis by sending copies of their Disk(s) of the Month.

QTY

( ) Sound & Graphics Mar '89
( ) Red Storm Rising Demo Disk
( ) C64 1581/Ram Expansion Utility Collection
( ) 128 Disk Mar '89

See March's newsletter, page 14, for details about these disks.

Total ( ) quantity
Total ($ ) sent

COMPUTER FURNITURE OFFER!!

Just a reminder that the furniture offer expires April 12th. Call one of the officers by then if you wish to take advantage of this offer. Look in March's issue, pages 20 through 24 for complete details. Take advantage of this great buy!!

Treasurer's Report

TREASURER'S REPORT 3-15-89

OPENING BALANCE 2-14-89 $2093.63
DEPOSITS:
LIBRARY DISKS $288.00
CLUB DUES 124.00
JIFFY DOS 686.15
-------
$1098.15
EXPENSES:
NEWSLETTER (MARCH) $172.40
JIFFY DOS ORDER $634.10
P.O. BOX RENTAL (1YR) 39.00
NEWSLETTER SUPPLIES 72.49
--------
$917.99
CLOSING BALANCE 3-15-89 $2273.79

GARY THURMAN
TREASURER

MACC FAIR FLYER

Pull out the MACC Fair Flyer in the middle of this issue, make copies and post at your office, grocery store, anywhere you can post it. Let's really do our part to advertise the MACC Fair and have a FANTASTIC turnout April 29th!!!

President's Ponderings

COMMODORE ON THE RISE

I was able to pick up a British Commodore magazine in a shop the other day. Its title is Commodore Computing International and its posted price is £1.20 or $3.50 in good ole USA dollars. They had a feature piece of which I couldn't identify the author. I would like to quote the author on one point.

"Commodore have sold so many in the last year, over 2 million worldwide--- twice as many 64's worldwide in any year since the machine's release---any plans regarding discontinuing the machine's production have been shelved indefinitely."

I would like for you to ponder on that for a bit. What this means of course is continued software and hardware support for some time. What this means is continuing sales of both new and used machines. What this means is that we are in for a heavy growth period in the club. Did you see Target's full color ad Sunday? Have you seen the software selections in the book stores? I don't know about you, but I think there are more places to shop than I ever remember to buy Commodore software. Hardware is different; at least it seems there are fewer places to buy. But there are still quite a few places like Target, Service Merchandise, Sears, Software Etc., Games and Gadgets and more I'm not familiar with. Not to mention the mail order houses.

We need the support of every member of our club to help us reach new people.

The problem that faces any club, of course, is how to reach the new user. We need the support of every member of our club to help us reach new people. It's your help that brings in the new people. Post our calendars on the community bulletin boards and workplace. Invite your friends to come and join us. We are here to provide the support you need and we cannot do that without growth. We need new people who can participate in our activities and to buy our disks of the month and to use our bulletin board and to ask questions and attend our classes, to read and submit articles to our magazine. We know they are out there!

New ideas and new subjects keep this club exciting.

Let's face it; if we stay the same we only have ourselves to do all these things. New ideas and new subjects keep this club exciting. Do your part to support the club; bring a friend, post that calendar, make that call to your buddy at the radio station or newspaper. Help us spread the word! We can help with your Commodore!

Bob Nunn

1989 Budget

According to the MCUC Bylaws, the President will submit a budget to the March board meeting. I take my responsibilities of office seriously, maybe sometimes too much so. When I looked through the past files and asked other board members I could find no previous records of any past budget.

The plans that we have spelled out for the Club for 89 are very positive and almost aggressive. I think you will find this budget reflects the same. I plan for continued growth in both members and services we provide for members, and while a great deal of the plans require physical work there are many parts that will require funds.

Respectfully Submitted March 16, 1989

Bob Nunn

EXPENSES - MONTHLY AVG
1989 1988
Disks $ 90.00 $ 63.00
Phone $ 22.00 $ 22.00
Postage $ 47.50 $ 40.00
Newsletter/flyers $140.00 $ 77.00
Software $ 50.00 $ 15.00
Misc. $ 50.00 $ 44.00
------- -------
Total $389.50 $191.00
INCOME - MONTHLY AVG
Library Sales $300.00 $225.00
Dues $250.00 $182.00
------- -------
Total $550.00 $407.00
BOARD APPROVED EXPENDITURES
Christmas Party $500.00 $416.00
New Equipment* $785.00 $525.00
Show Expenses $150.00 $ 45.00
Fair Prize $100.00 $ 86.20
------- -------
$1535.00 $1072.20

New Equipment - approved by members

(2) 1581 disks drives $189.00
(1) 1541-II $189.00
(1) Snapshot Cartridge $ 73.00
(1) 2400 baud modem $145.00

Old BBS equipment will be sold through closed bids.(Bylaws)

BBS Notes

SYSOP'S SCUTTLEBUTT

It's less than a week since Andrew and I took over THE bbs but we've already done some work on it. I'm sorry to say, not too many user's have seen it. Somehow I was expecting a lot of calls. But then this is only Thursday, March 3!

The transition from 366-4676 to 276-6868 ( notice the new number ) went VERY smoothly. Thanks to both BOBS for their efforts during that period. It would have been very difficult to do it alone.

The few changes I have planned for the board are not going to be drastic. It's a very difficult job trying to out-do one of the best sysops in the country.

I do have some Ideas for the sub headers (grafic) and will gradually change some of the libraries to include interesting articles about our computers, maybe a few "Dox" files on P/D software and some enlightened reviews on whatever new programs I can get my hands on.

Much of what goes into these articles depend on YOU the reader. If you have recently bought some software, Tell me about it on-line. Or maybe <sneaky grin> loan it to me so I can write a review of it, that is, if you don't want to.

Remember that the BBS is on-line for you. I want to provide whatever I can, given the extent of the MCUC library and confines of the law. BUT I can't give you what you want if I don't know what that is.

Give the old C chat or F feedback button a try. You may be pleasantly surprised that it really works!

Checking the Editorial Calendar that Cheryn presented in last month's issue of this publication, I see that April is EDUCATION month so you'll be finding a lot of tutorials and educational materials in the drives.

A TIP O' THE OLD HAT TO YA!

== JOHN ==

Notice: We do have a problem with the system not accepting 300 baud users. We are working on fixing it; please be patient.

BBS UPGRADE VOTE

The officers discussed purchase of new equipment for the MCUC BBS at the March Board meeting. Following is an explanation of the purchases. According to the bylaws, the membership must approve purchases over a certain amount. Voting will take place at the April General Meeting on this proposal.

We propose to purchase:

(2) 1581 drives $189.00 ea.
(1) 1541-II drive $189.00
(1) SuperSnapshot cartridge $ 73.00
(1) 2400 baud modem $145.00
-------
$785.00

This new equipment would replace the (2) SFD1001's, the MSD-2 and the borrowed 4040 that is currently online. The old equipment would be offered for sale through closed bids as per the bylaws.

VP Comments

ASLEEP ON THE JOB

Poor Commodore! No matter how hard they try, they can't seem to kill off the 64 and 128. Users like their machines and see no reason to change for the sake of change. New buyers are still coming to Commodore's eight bit computers, often times on the recommendation of experienced users. The abundance of software and attractive price also help the machines stay popular.

But Commodore would rather work to make the Amiga sell. Peripherals become harder to find for the 64 and 128 as Commodore cuts back production in favor of Amiga peripherals and even new Amiga models. New machines with megabytes of memory are introduced while ram expansion units and the 1571 disk drive for the 128 are ignored, supposedly because of a shortage of ram chips.

It has been my impression that Commodore users are some of the most "brand" loyal of all computer users. User groups picked up the slack when Commodore support of any kind completely disappeared. But enough is enough. If they're not even going to manufacture products that are wanted in the marketplace, who needs them? They could sell the rights to make the products we want to someone that would appreciate the business and we would leave them alone with their Amigas they are so proud of.

Wake up, Commodore! If you want our business tomorrow, you'd better take care of business today.

Ron Montgomery

March Meeting Notes

The March Meeting was held at State Tech Fulton Auditorium on March 7, 1989. We had approximately 82 present, a good turnout.

There is a lot of excitement in the air at the MCUC meetings. The club is going places and growing and it's exciting to be present and watching. The advanced planning done by the board members is showing. The meetings seem to flow well and hopefully there is something for everyone at each meeting.

We are continuing to look at new ideas and products to offer to the club members. Being a part of MCUC this year could save you a lot of money and bring you exciting new products and software unavailable at the prices we will be able to offer.

We are also hoping to have some very exciting demonstrations in the meetings in the coming months. As always, we continue to try and improve the contents and format of the newsletter each month.

Excitement is contagious! Bob and I feel privileged to be a part of MCUC in this EXCITING year. We hope you catch the excitement too!!

Bob & Cheryn Nunn

Special Announcement

COPY SESSION

A copy session will be held in May, date and place yet to be announced. We wanted to let you know how exciting and different this copy session will be from it's predecessors, however, so that you can build your anticipation for this exciting event.

One, we hope to have NO LONG LINES!! There will be an order form in the May issue of the newsletter listing the most recent releases plus an area for writing in older disks. If you get your order form to us before the copy session, we will have your disks ready. We hope to have an inventory of the most recent releases so that all you have to do is trade your blank disks for the copies you want, or pay the $1 per disk copy fee.

Two, we're going to have extra computers set up with people running demos of various programs. These people will also be available to run any program in the library you may have trouble with and answer most of your questions, we hope. If you can't get your order form to us early, bring it in and while we're making your copies, you can view the demos, ask someone to demonstrate how to run a program you've been stuck on or have a cookie and a cup of coke. Just remember, there is no one who has run all the programs in the library, and we will try our best to help you.

Three, as an added attraction, Bob Earnheart has offered to do FREE drive cleaning and alignment checks. Bring your disk drive and let him check it out!!

SOUND EXCITING!?!? You bet! This is your opportunity to fill in the gaps in your personal library, at a considerable savings. We will have 10 packs of 5 1/4" disks available for sale if your stock is low. Of course, trading blanks for copies is the most economical way to get the copies you want. A lot of work and planning is going into this copy session to make it the BEST ever! Show your appreciation by BEING THERE!!!

Editor's Desk

"I GET EXCITED..."

I know ya'll are going to think I'm crazy when I say this but, I AM EXCITED ABOUT MY COMMODORE!! Don't get me wrong, I've always LIKED the Commodore, I just never got real excited about it. It was a tool to use to achieve an established goal, whatever that may have been. This past year, most of my use of the Commodore has been the production of the monthly newsletters. The Commodore 64 or 128 is just not a big enough machine to do WYSIWYG desktop publishing. BUT NOW, I've found the next best thing..."THE WRITE STUFF"

This "word processor", in quotes because it is so much more, is the best thing to come along since the microwave in MY life. This month's issue has been produced largely with TWS, and what had previosly taken about 35 hours to do, took only about 20 hours.

Look elsewhere in this issue for more information about "The Write Stuff". You too, can become a newsletter editor, author or publisher in your spare time with "The Write Stuff"!!!

Cheryn Nunn

Store Review

OPERATOR HEADGAP VISITS SOFTWARE ETC

by Bob Nunn

We had heard that Software Etc. had expressed interest in working with the club. I had never spent much time in the Mall of Memphis since only crazy people face the weekend traffic on American Way. In fact, when I retire I plan to buy a wrecker and sit out in the parking lot. No, too much work for a retired fellow. Anyways, we barely made it in the Saturday afternoon traffic. We parked in France and walked for at least two days. Finally made it to the Mall (I suggest you try weeknights) and found the store. After taking a quick run through we noticed what we thought was not a lot of Commodore Stuff, but when I counted titles WOW! They carry around 145 top software titles and roughly 50 budget titles. They really have the newest stuff and their budget selection is also very good. Prices were all discounted from list. I stopped by the magazine rack and found two titles I had never heard of that looked good. They have a great selection of computer magazines! Also, a very large of selection of computer books.

you are in either mall make sure to stop in and say hi. Check out those magazines too. I would have to give the folks at Software Etc. an I had been asked if I need help by a lovely young lady before I had been in the store 2 minutes. After looking around, I made it up to the front desk to see Jim, our contact. He said that he was always glad to support local user groups and would be happy to work with us. We left him some newsletters and briefly discussed doing demo's on the 64/128 in the larger Raleigh Springs Mall Store. We were very pleased. I am hopeful that if we as a club show our support by letting the staff at Software Etc. know that we are MCUC members that arrangements can be made for further benefits. Next time Operator Headgap ***** 5 Star rating.

BACK TO THE BASICS

Hi! We are new members who attended the Beginner's and BASIC Classes in February. We were asked to write about the classes because we attended all of them. Well, the turnout for the Beginner's class was pretty good; the turnout for the BASIC class, not so good. I don't know why, we enjoyed it immensely. We were very impressed by the fact that the teachers (John Blackmer and Andrew George) would spend so much of their weekend to help us beginners! They answered a lot of questions that we had (some of them pretty dumb!!) and had patience with us. We found out quite a bit that we didn't know about hardware and software, covered the BASIC commands, and covered BBS and modem use. All in all, it was time well spent. Although it was great for our family (we ended up with essentially private tutors!), I felt bad for them, with such a small BASIC class. (Three people!) Maybe a solution would be to not have a class until there were a minimum number (10?) signed up, so the teachers wouldn't waste their time.

Anyway, from your very small, but very appreciative, class--thank you both very much! And if you decide to have more classes, we'll be there!

Dee, Nanette and Janette Hickman

Special Announcement

MEMPHIS AREA COMPUTER COUNCIL (MACC)
P.O. BOX 280359
MEMPHIS, TN 38128

FOR RELEASE APRIL 1989

SUBJECT: COMPUTER FAIR AT STATE TECH
CONTACT: GARY COX, VICE-CHAIRMAN MEMPHIS AREA COMPUTER COUNCIL, (901) 358-0667

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE, FEBRUARY 28, 1989 -- THE MEMPHIS AREA COMPUTER COUNCIL (MACC) IN CONJUNCTION WITH STATE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE WILL BE HOSTING A NON-PROFIT COMPUTER FAIR FROM 10AM - 5PM SATURDAY APRIL 29TH 1989 IN THE FULTON BUILDING AT STATE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE LOCATED AT 5983 MACON ROAD IN MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE.

MACC IS A CONSORTIUM OF COMPUTER USER GROUPS IN THE MEMPHIS AREA, AND EACH GROUP WILL HAVE AN INDIVIDUAL DISPLAY AREA AT THE FAIR. DEMONSTRATING SOME OF THE LATEST IN COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE, USER GROUP REPRESENTATIVES WILL BE AVAILABLE TO ANSWER MOST COMPUTER RELATED QUESTIONS. GUEST SPEAKERS ARE SCHEDULED TO GIVE PRESENTATIONS ON SPECIAL TOPICS SUCH AS DESKTOP PUBLISHING AND COMPUTERS IN SMALL BUSINESS ETC... (EXACT SCHEDULE OF PRESENTATIONS WILL BE AVAILABLE IN APRIL.) THE STATE TECH ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT WILL ALSO BE HAVING OPEN HOUSE THAT DAY AND WILL BE GIVING TOURS OF THEIR FACILITIES, DEMONSTRATING THEIR COMPUTER EQUIPMENT AND SHOWING WHAT THEY HAVE TO OFFER TO THE COMPUTER COMMUNITY...

AMONG THE COMPUTER BRANDS SCHEDULED TO BE REPRESENTED ARE IBM COMPATIBLES (MS-DOS), APPLE, COMMODORE, ATARI, AMIGA, COLOR, TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, OSBORNE AND OPUS BBS SYSTEM OPERATORS...

THE EVENT IS FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. DOOR PRIZES WILL BE GIVEN AWAY HOURLY AS WELL AS FREE POPCORN AND COKES FOR EVERYONE. THIS FAIR WILL BE EDUCATIONAL AS WELL AS ENTERTAINING. THE MEMPHIS AREA COMPUTER COUNCIL AND STATE TECH ARE BOTH NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT GARY COX (VICE-CHAIRMAN & IN CHARGE OF PUBLICITY) AT (901) 358-0667 OR BILL DEWITT (CHAIRMAN) AT (901) 346-6720. DON'T MISS ONE OF MEMPHIS'S BIGGEST COMPUTER FAIRS!

MCUC WILL BE PRESENT AT THE FAIR AGAIN THIS YEAR. WE NEED VOLUNTEERS TO BRING THEIR EQUIPMENT, DEMONSTRATE THEIR FAVORITE SOFTWARE AND ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS THEY CAN. WE ALSO NEED VOLUNTEERS TO HELP WITH A MEMBERSHIP SIGN- UP TABLE, TO HELP PEOPLE GET THEIR COMPUTER EQUIPMENT IN AND OUT OF THE BUILDING. THERE ARE ALSO THINGS TO BE DONE PRIOR TO THE DAY OF THE FAIR SUCH AS SIGN MAKING, PHONE CALLING, ETC. CONTACT BOB OR CHERYN NUNN OR RON MONTGOMERY IF YOU ARE WILLING TO HELP IN ANY WAY. LET'S MAKE THIS THE BEST YET!!

Librarian's Shelf

APRIL DISKS OF THE MONTH

APRIL 64 DISKS OF THE MONTH

We have a rather large selection this month, thanks to ordering public domain library disks from commercial sources. Also, our new exchange program is really starting to pay off. You will see even more great programs in the future. Our 7 disk selections will be on special this month for only $10.00 for the entire collection. That is a $4.00 savings over the each price!

APRIL UTILITIES DISK

ZIP/UNZIP is a new utility that groups files together for transfer much like arc, or lynx. This one is easier to use than most and allows multiple drive configuration. It's a must-have for all telecommunications buffs. Look for files with a number followed with an exclamation point. l!testprogram, 2!testprogram etc. is an example of zipped files.

DISK CONTROLLER v1.1 is a utility package written by one of our newer members, Kevin Dunn. He has included docs on this disk that you must read using a sequential file reader. You should find it easy to use right from the menu though. It has many useful and fast routines unlike many programs of this type. Kevin has promised to keep upgrading the program as he finds new routines but I think you will find this one great from the start.

MULTI PRINT is a multiple format printer for things like index cards and more.

PANIC BUTTON SB allows recovery of files under defined conditions. Programmers should find this one useful.

1581 DEV CHANGE allows you to autoboot with a different drive number. This one should have been on the 128 disk but it's too late now, so there you have it.

HOMEMATE.DW is another all purpose writer and filer. This one works good.

ALARM v.7 turns your 64 into an alarm clock that wakes you at the time you specify.

MAILING LIST will print out your mailing list on labels. What makes this one special is that it has room for 600!!! entries.

GAS!64.9/88, Graphic Assault System- allows for manipulation of hires graphics.

[Graphic: GAS!64.9/88 - Title graphic screen.]

APRIL GAMES DISK!!

This one may turn out to be one of my favorites as these games are all of high quality. This one is a must have for the garners out there!!

KRACKOUT is an Arkanoid clone. It works almost as well as the Arkanoid program does!! When I first loaded it I would have sworn that it was a pirate game but it's listed as one of Peoplelinks best downloads in INFO magazine.

[Graphic: BLUEPRINT - assemble the robot.]

MUTANT PB the pb stands for pinball and this one plays well.

[Graphic: KRACK OUT - bat and ball not shown. Takes perception skills.]

SNAKMAN is a Pacman clone. It doesn't work near as well as the original but it plays well and the youngsters will enjoy it.

BLUEPRINT is a great little game. The object of the game is to assemble the robot by placing piece from the buildings onto the blueprint, but watch out for the bombs and the monsters!

[Graphic: MUTANT.PB - great pinball action.]

Two releases for April with not only some super new graphics but great new utilities on each disk to make them much more useable even if you don't have Print Shop. Each disk includes both A & B side graphics and the utilities to match. Due to space limitation we are only listing the A side utils. The utilities are on both and here is what they do.

PS DUMP V2.0+ allows you to print out the graphics.

PSLABEL allows you to make your own graphic labels.

PS/PM/NR v1.2 allows conversion of Print Shop graphics to Print Master or Newsroom and back.

PRINTSHOP TO GEOS takes graphics to the GEOS format.

PRSHOP TO DOODLE puts them in doodle format for editing or other uses.

PRSHOP<>PRSHOP takes A to B or B to A

PSA2B2A.128C80 works in 128 mode.

PRINTSHOP DISK 1 features computer company logos. (see illustrations)

PRINTSHOP DISK 2 features computer parts. (see illustrations)

APRIL 128 DISK OF THE MONTH

I wish these were all dynamite programs, but unfortunately they are the usual 128 type programs we seem to scrape up as of late. Some of these should at least prove useful. We gleaned the best of 4 different releases, so I suppose it could be worse. We have found some new sources and I am hopeful we can provide the same quality as we do in the 64 area soon. We included Disk Whiz 1.1 so you can boot up by loading star and view the files or read the docs.

DRAW POKER 128 is a halfway decent card game in 80 col.

INCREDIBOOT is a boater type program that you should find useful.

MH-COMP.START0.8 is a compiler for the 128. It has a couple of examples included. Some of you programmers should find this one useful. I didn't have time to test this one to see how effective it was but it does seem to run ok.

DIS v1.0 is a 128 ml disassembler. The instructions are from version 1.1 but the matching version didn't seem to work properly and v1.0 did.

GL128.80 is a good grocery list program.

BASIC SCANNER checks out 64 basic for offending commands. This should prove very helpful to anyone converting programs. With docs.

HOUSE INVENTORY helpful database to keep track of things. Would be good to keep a printout offsite for insurance purposes.

BRAIN QUIZ more trivia challenges.

Demo Releases

The Write Stuff 64 Demo
The Write Stuff 128 Demo

These are the demo disks of the program you will see in action at the April Meeting.

The Write Stuff

A Review

by Cheryn Nunn

Well, it's time to tell you about "The Write Stuff". You've seen it mentioned several times elsewhere in this issue and now we're going to tell you all about. First, I'm going to tell you about some of the neat things I've done with it in preparing this newsletter. Then you'll see some comments from other users of TWS that were taken from the material received when I ordered TWS. Following that will be the price list of what YOU will pay if you choose to order TWS. Finally, the next two pages will be the list of features of the 64 and 128 version, taken straight from Busy Bee Softwares material.

Since this is not a WYSIWYG word processor, they have a preview mode that runs very quickly. No waiting while it "thinks" about it. The preview mode actually scrolls too fast for reading unless you're a true speed reader. Pushing the Control key will pause it while you check something closely and if you have a long document and don't want to see all the preview, ESC will take you immediately back to your edit mode. Preview mode shows you all the formatting you've put in your document, such as margins, italicize, bold, underline, etc. and also shows your page breaks. If you decide you don't want that one line tagging at the end of a page, go back to edit mode, insert a return before the line, and preview again to make sure it will print at the top of the next page. It's so fast, this is not a problem.

Double columns, what can I say. Again, you don't see them in edit mode, but on going to preview, there they are. In a way, it's almost easier working that way since if edit mode was in double column, the amount of cursoring and moving would become tiresome.

Search and Replace. I got ahold of an article that I suspect may have been written on an IBM (shudder) and I could not get it translated right (although I didn't run through the entire list of translators ((14 plus a generic)) available). Since I had a good idea what the article was about and could see some of the text I did a search and replace on each of the characters that I knew what they should be. This feature will replace all occurences of one character with the character you specify from the cursor down. I just took them one at a time, going back to the beginning of my document each time. It took me about 15 minutes to replace all the strange characters and strip out the extra returns, but I got the article intact, just as it was written.

Macros, a blessing for all non-programmers. What is a macro? It's sort of a mini program that allows you to do in one or two keystrokes what might take MANY to do normally. In Lotus 1-2-3 (at least the older version) you had to type the macro in, so you had to know how to state what you wanted to do. In Excel, for the Macintosh, there is a macro-recorder, much like a tape recorder. You turn on the recorder, actually do what you want your macro to do, turn the recorder off, and your macro is written for you. This on a 1 meg machine. TWS does it in 64K!! Granted there is a 250 character limit for each macro but just set up 2 or 3 macros, call them up one after the other and your work is considerably reduced!! This is one of the features I will demonstrate at the April meeting.

These are just a few of the many features I used and I didn't use all the features available. The great thing about TWS is that you can sit down and type in a document without using any of the special features and it will print. Or you can go just as indepth into the features as you choose to go and it will still print.

Now for some comments from other users.

"I currently use Speedscript and have carefully tested Easy Script, RUN Script, Paperclip, Fleet System II, Omniwriter, Homeward, Font Master II, and, of course, GEOS. "The Write Stuff" blows the others away! Just can't get over how GOOD this one is! (Gary Stephenson, West Covina, CA)

"I received my copy of TWS just before Christmasa and have had several days to get acquainted with it. I have been using Paperclip for most of my work at home and Displaywrite 3 on the IBM's at work. I am also familiar with SpeedScript and Easy Writer. By far, your's is superior to all of them. (Robert Bocock, Montclair, CA)

"I am the proud owner of your new program (TWS). I got it through OPUG, a Commodore users group in Port Angeles, WA....The whole club is just going nuts about it. We generally have been using Speed Script but it's going bye bye. We wish you all the luck in the world...It is the most impressive example of programming I have ever run across. (James Rosand, WA)

I could go on and on. There were THREE full pages of comments from other users. Granted, there are a lot of good word processors on the market, but this is one that just can't be beat for the money. Aha, that leads right into the next part of this article; what will YOU pay for this program?

There are a variety of options in purchasing this program. The basic purchase provides you with the program, a booklet, and a registration card. In using TWS, I found the reference manual indispensable, so we will include the reference manual as part of the package. The keyboard overlay I found very useful, but you could function without it so it will be optional. You can also get TWS with S.A.M. (Software Automatic Mouth). This is a speech synthesizer that works only in 64 mode.

The Write Stuff 64 (with S.A.M.)
$17.00 reg retail $25.00

The Write Stuff 64 (w/o S.A.M.)
$10.00 reg retail $20.00

The Write Stuff 128 (40 & 80 col)
$20.00 reg retail $30.00

The Write Stuff 128 (with BB Talker 64 and S.A.M.)
$25.00

Keyboard Overlays 64 or 128
$2.00 ea.

We will take orders at the April meeting and have the programs available at the May meeting. If you're unsure after the demo, purchase the demo disk, take it home and let us know by April 13th.

MACC FAIR!!
APRIL 29, 1989
STATE TECH
BE THERE !!

Look elsewhere in this issue for more details!

Real Programmer's Say the Darndest Things

Reprinted from WICU Word Wrap, Feb. 1989

[The following is an excerpt from this article above. These are REAL words and phrases used by REAL developers creating REAL Commodore software and hardware products. All the more enjoyable!]

AD DOS-EUM (adj) The feeling you get when working with a misbehaving (or ridiculous) operating system.

ARCHIVAL BACKUP (n) Software that a LEECH has HORKed. See: LEECH, HORK.

ARTHRITIS (n) The infliction a mouse gets when its rollers are dirty.

BAUDBARF (n) Any garbage characters sent across a terminal as a result of a disconnect. For example when you logg off of a BBS.

BIT BUCKET (n) Where all overwritten (and thereby lost) data goes.

BIT-TWIDDLER (n) A Hacker.

BODYSURF CODE (n) A program subroutine written quickly in the heat of inspiration without the benefit of flowcharts or deep thought. Like its namesake sport, the result is usually a wipeout (e.g., a program crash) that leaves the programmer eating sand.

BOOBUGS (n) Bugs that jump out at you while you're looking for a completely different bug.

BSW ENGINEERING (n) See PROGRAMMER.

BUGLETTE(S) (n) Any new bug or bugs created by fixing a known bug.

CABLELEXIA (n) A fumblin condition that prevents you from connecting a cable to the computer, even after chaing the connection several times.

CHICKEN HEAD (n) The Commodore LOGO. Also: Chicken Lips.

COSMIC RAYS (n) A natural sub-atomic phenomenon which gets worse near computer RAM chips; frequently used to explain computer or program malfunctions.

DIRATION (n) The time it takes to get a directory to list.

DOINK (n) A generic verb used to describe some programming action. Usage: "I had to doink the subroutine." Compare: FROB.

DORKED (adj) Destroyed or damaged by accident or through stupidity. Compare MUNGED.

EDITITIS (n) Mental confusion experienced from using more than three word processors and/or programming editors.

FLOORMAT (n) What you feel like when you format a disk that you shouldn't have.

FOAMWARE (n) Programs stored in bubble memory.

FROB (n) A generic noun substitute for an object that has no name or when its name has been temporarily forgotten or is too long to bother saying. A synonym for "thingamabob". Compare: DOINK.

HACK (n) An inelegant thrown-together piece of program code that gets the job done. A "quick and dirty" fix for a bug. Compare: KLUDGE.

HORK (v) To borrow without returning.

I.M.H.O. Shorthand for "In My Humble Opinion".

ICONITIS (n) The condition of an icon-driven user interface when you can't find the icon you're looking for or need.

KLUDGE (n) A clever and usually obscure programming trick. Not an elegant algorhythm, but more respected than a HACK.

LEECH (n) A non-reciprocating borrower of software.

MUGGER (n) A user who pirates software using only commercial 'archival' software preset to automatically copy a specific program.

MUNGE (v) To destroy, convolute, obfuscate or render unusable either source code, object code or program data.

NO-BOZO ROUTINE (n) A program subroutine that has little or no error checking, expects a specific (usually complicated) set of parameters and is therefore prone to crash in the wrong hands.

PIXEL SORT (n) A compression routine where all the pixels are sorted by color, counted and reduced to a single number.

POWER-GEEK (n) A programmer.

PROGRAMMER (n) A sophisticated carbon-based machine designed to turn coffee into computer software.

PROP-HEAD (n) Short for Propeller head. A programmer.

R.S.N. Shorthand for "Real Soon Now".

R.T.F.M. Shorthand, translated politely as "Please Read the Manual".

SCROOGED (adj) When data is irretrievable, especially from a disk.

SIP (n) Self-Inflicted Problem.

SLUSHOMATIC (n) A game which contains far more features than the user has any right to expect.

SPAGHETTI CODE (n) A program or routine with confusing, non-linear and nonsensical organization, especially from novice programmers or lazy hackers.

SPLAT (v) To update a section of the screen as quickly as possible.

TARDYWARE (n) Software released considerably later than originally announced or advertised.

TECHNO-WEENIE (n) A programmer or hardware designer.

THAT'S NICE, I LIKE IT (phr) What you say when someone else has a bug in their program.

THE TOMORROW PROBLEM (n) Any problem that is insignificant compared to the need for sleep.

TOAST (n) Burned up hardware.

TRON (adj) A nasty acting application, desk accessory or printer driver used by Berkeley Softworks during the initial testing of new software for bugs which purposely pushed standard GEOS conventions to the limits. Usage: "He loaded a TRON input device."

UNCLE PARSER (n) An extremely user-friendly text interpreter in a Beginner's Level text adventure game. Usually responds in single syllable words.

UNDOCUMENTED FEATURE (n) A bug; especially a positive- acting bug.

USER-HOSTILE (adj) Opposite of user friendly.

VAPORWARE (n) Heavily advertised software that never makes it to the market.

WIMP INTERFACE (n) An acronym for Window, Icons, Mouse, Pulldown menus. Usage; "GEOS, the Amiga Workbench and the Macintosh operating system are all WIMP interfaces."

'Y' CODE (n) Among some who program in the "C" language, a programmer who does things in a very unusual manner (especially when he is tired) is said to program in "Y".

ZOMBIEWARE (n) A product which has been previously announced and/or advertised, but is not released due to circumstances beyond the company's control. Compare: TARDYWARE, VAPORWARE.

RETRACTION

The Jiffy Dos Prices listed on page 31 of the March Issue were effective until March 1 only. Creative Micro Designs issued a price increase effective March 1 of "about 10%", is what they said. When we learn the new prices, we will pass on the information to you. We apologize if the incorrect prices have caused a problem for anyone.

The Editor

Term Paper Preparation

by Cheryn Nunn

The main theme for the newsletter this month is Term Paper Preparation, SAT Preparation and using your computer for both. In looking through catalogs and visiting software stores, I have found there are numerous programs to help you in doing the aforementioned things.

TERM PAPER PREPARATION

In term paper preparation, there are programs available to assist you in all levels of the project. Let's go over the basic steps in preparing a term paper.

First is to decide the topic of the paper. Next would be to gather data concerning that topic. After assimilating the information, you would then organize it into a coherent order. Finally, you would write the finished paper.

Of course, the decision of the topic is up to you. From there you can use "terminal programs" to visit the online services to gather data concerning the topic you've picked. We won't go through all the terms available to you here in this issue. Suffice it to say, there is a good term on the Starter Disk in your New Member Packet that is excellent for the purpose.

Organization, the key to all good papers. A program called "Thinking Cap" by Broderbund, helps organize notes and ideas into a logical, coherent manner, such as an outline format. "The Write Stuff" also contains an outliner. Look for outliners or idea organizers if you decide to buy this type of program. your research and outline, the term paper itself should be a whiz. The complexity of your paper can help determine the word processor to choose, unless you already have a favorite. For simple book reports, Big Editor would be a good choice. It's simple and easy to use. For more complex reports, where you want headers and footers, footnotes, etc., a more complex word processor If you've done a thorough job on would better serve your purpose. Of course, "The Write Stuff" would be an excellent choice. Babbage's in Hickory Ridge Mall says their top seller is Word Writer by Timeworks. Software Etc., in both the Mall of Memphis and Raleigh Springs Mall, say their top seller is GeoWrite. There are many, many word processors on the market. If purchasing one, make sure it is compatible with your printer.

The important thing is to be familiar with the word processor before beginning a large project such as a term paper. It will decrease your frustration and pressure enormously while working on the project. And of course, SAVE your work frequently!!

SAT PREPERATION

SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) preparation is important for anyone contemplating entering college. The scores you make on this test and the ACT can determine which schools will accept you into their academic programs. Advance preparation can help elevate the scores you make on these tests. I found three programs of this type and I'm sure there are others. Mastering the ACT and Mastering the SAT ($79.95 each from Mindscape) are two of them. The third, Simon and Schuster's Computer Study Guide for the SAT (Simon and Schuster $29.95) is reviewed elsewhere is this issue and will be demoed at the April meeting.

I hope this review will aid anyone who faces a term paper or the college entrance exams this spring. With all the good software out there these days, I really wouldn't mind being back in college again. Sure beats pencil and paper!

DISCOUNTS!!

We have received the following notice of discounts offered by two stores here in Memphis. Take Advantage of these offers!! When you go in to shop, be sure and tell them you're a member of MCUC. These stores support user groups. Tell them you appreciate them!!

SOFTWARE ETC.

At both the Mall of Memphis and Raleigh Springs Stores. Between 1 and 2 PM on Sunday's, 10% discount on anything in the store (with the exception of Amiga hardware) to club members presenting their club membership card.

BABBAGE'S

Purchase 10 items of over $15 apiece and get $5 off the next purchase!

Game Tip

DOUBLE DRAGON - to cause your enemy to become stuck in one place, move all the way to the top, then jump over your opponent. He will then be stuck in place and you can turn around and kick him. Moving back down the screen will return the game to normal. - Ami Mukerjee

Secretor's Notes

The official MCUC Board Meeting was held March 16, 1989 at the State Tech Cafeteria. The meeting was called to order by Bob Nunn, President at 7:35 PM. Present were Bob Nunn, Bob Earnheart, Education Coordinator, Dick Coffman, Secretary, Cheryn Nunn, Editor, Ron Montgomery, Vice President, Gary Thurman, Treasurer, Ben Hudgens, Temporary Librarian, John Blackmer, Sysop and Charlie Wirth, MACC Rep.

The budget for 1989 was presented by Bob Nunn. Purchases of new equipment and the sale of old equipment was discussed. A motion to accept the budget as proposed was made by Ron Montgomery, seconded by Bob Earnheart. Motion carried.

The MACC Fair will be April 29 at State Tech. MCUC will have two rooms at the Fair. We will have demos, disks for sale and will take applications and renewals for membership. There will also be seminars in other rooms. Watch the newsletter for more details.

The demos for April will be The Write Stuff", a new word processor for the 64 and 128 and a review of Simon and Schuster's "Computer Study Guide for the SAT". This program will then be available for checkout through Bob Earnheart for any students wishing to prepare for the SAT. Motion made by Bob Earnheart to take orders at the next meeting for The Write Stuff". Seconded by Gary Thurman, motion carried.

Charlie Wirth will be the club's CASE Rep for the coming year. Meeting adjourned at 9:30 PM.

Respectfully Submitted,
Richard Coffman

UPGRADE YOUR 1700 REU TO 512K

by Gary Barrett

Reprinted from Salem Area Commodore Users Newsletter, March, 1989

Copyright 1986 Twin Cities 128 PO Box 4625, Saint Paul MN 55104

Got a soldering iron, some solder and good eyes? Basically, that's all it takes to transform the C1700 RAM 128K RAM expansion module into a full- fledged 512K RAM cartridge.

You see, someone in the engineering department at Commodore either was thinking about us penny-pinching users, or decided to save the company money...but the controller and the PC board for the C1700 (the 128K expansion cartridge) for the 128 is the same as the C1750 (the 512K expansion cartridge). The only REAL change that you need to make is to change the 64K RAM chips in the C1700 to 256K chips, and some other modifications we'll talk about.

The new RAM chips, when ordered from a reputable company, will cost you from $2.75-3.75 each. You will want to shop for the best quality chips for your money, as cheap RAM chips can cause heartaches later on if they don't work. It's also wise not to mix and match batchs of RAM chips. Ask an IBM user who's done that on his PC about the troubles you can expect - they can be pretty bad! I recommend the use of IC sockets, since they are fairly cheap and mean that you don't have to apply any heat to the new RAM chips, thus you avoid having to unsolder and replace any damaged or defective ones.

There are a couple of warnings in this operation, though. First, the minute that you open the case of the CI700, you are voiding the warranty. That means any changes you make are FINAL. If you do the work and botch it up, plan on spending some bucks to get a qualified technician to put it back together again. Second, since this upgrade involves an extensive amount of soldering and desoldering, knowing how to remove ICs and re-solder them properly is a must. Cold solder joints mean trouble, if not now then in the near future. Plus, too much heat in the installation process or a little static electricity is all it takes to zap a RAM chip into oblivion.

Ingredients:

1-C1700 RAM Expander
16-256K Dynamic RAM chips, either 150ns or 120ns
16-16-pin I.C. sockets
Pencil-type soldering iron Desoldering tool or wick
Resin-core solder
Sharp knife

First you must open the C1700 and extract the printed circuit board. The C1700 is incredibly easy to open since everything either snaps together or slides. In the case of the outside case, a little tug on each side should open the case. The inside metal box that encloses the PC board is a one- piece board that sort of snaps together, and will probably be a two-piece item by the time you are finished, since the corners are about as fragile as the ones I made in high school shop class.

Now look at the printed circuit board. You'll see a large IC with the letters "MOS" on it at the top part of the board. DO NOT TOUCH THIS CHIP OR EXPOSE IT TO STATIC ELECTRICITY OR HEAT, as it is EXTREMELY sensitive to heat and static and, since it is the controller for the RAM expander and is only available from Commodore (which owns the manufacturer, MOS); if it is damaged, you are sunk.

Below the controller chip are 16 64K RAM chips, soldered into the board, labeled U1 through U17 on the board. These are the chips to replace. In the front part of the PC board you will see two areas marked J1 and J2 (near the edge connector). Jl must be cut to finish the RAM expansion job AFTER you replace the chips.

Before you begin the transplant operation, make either a mental or a hard copy note of the way the RAM chips sit on the PC board. You will notice that they have a little indentation on one end. Make sure that you install the chips so that the new 256K chips have their marker facing the same way. If not, the expansion WON'T work!!

With a soldering iron, NOT A SOLDERING GUN, remove all 16 of the RAM chips from the printed circuit board. AGAIN BE VERY CAREFUL TO AVOID TOUCH ING THE RAM EXPANSION CONTROLLER CHIP! Make sure not to scatter any of the solder to the rest of the board or to accidentally desolder any of the other parts of the board.

Using a toothpick, clean all of the excess solder out of the holes that the RAM chips were removed from, and with a toothbrush, brush any other solder from the PC board.

Now you can solder in the IC socket, making sure that you do not over- solder each connection. Make sure each solder joint is shiny - if it is dull, you have created the deadly cold solder joint and not only will your expansion unit not work properly, but my electronics teacher may call you to scold you.

After the sockets are installed, snapping the 256K RAM chips into them is about the easiest part of the whole story. Again, make sure they are installed with the marking in the SAME direction as the 64K chips were! When placing the new 41256 RAMS in the sockets, be very careful not to break the pins on the chips. If the pins are bent too wide for the sockets, very carefully squeeze the pins inward and gently press the chips into place. A chip insertion tool may be helpful.

With the knife, cut the thin solder trace between the two points on Jl. You MUST make sure that the two sections of Jl do not have any solder connecting them, so make the cut clean. Otherwise all your soldering will be in vain.

Even the best surgeon must close up after he or she is done, so the next task is to carefully put the circuit board back into the shielding, then snap the board into the bottom section of the outer case and finally join the two halves of the outer casing. Almost done!

This is the pins-and-needles part: NOW you have to take the newly-created 512K expansion and install it in your 128. Next, run the RAM TEST program that came on the disk with the C1700. It should return a "SIZE=512K" message when it is running, and tell you that there were no errors while the program is running.

Should an error show up in one of the banks, the first thing to do is to re-check all of your solder connections. Make sure you don't have two adjoining pins of the RAM chips soldered together. If that doesn't help, you may have either damaged a RAM chip, or may have gotten a defective one (and, unlike your computer, you can't return those and get a new one, so just buy another!) If all this fails, you should be prepared to pack up the whole module and take it to a service technician for a complete re-make.

Again, modifications to the RAM cartridge completely voids the warranty, so this operation is NOT for the novice in most cases. It's easy to damage the MOS chip and the RAM chips themselves, so if you do not know what you're doing, you can end up spending as much as you would have for a 1750.

Humor on Keyboard

"MY DISK DRIVE ATE IT" AND OTHER EXCUSES

By Dan Gutman

Before computers, (B.C.) kids used to come to school without their homework and tell the teacher, "My dog ate it".

In our more advanced society, kids come to school without their homework and tell the teacher, "My disk drive ate it."

Before computers, college kids used to come to class without their assignments and tell the professor, "Sorry man, bad karma." In our more advanced society, college kids come to class without their assignments and tell the professor, "Sorry man, bad software."

The personal computer, with all its quirks and frailties, is revolutionizing education in a manner which nobody predicted--it is providing a mother lode of new excuses that previous generations couldn't have even imagined.

For the sake of the unfortunate students faced with an evil teacher staring them in the face and asking "Why haven't you turned in your homework?" I have prepared a list of responses that might get you off the hook...

Simon & Schuster's Study Guide for the SAT

It's been a while since I took my college testing exams. They called the ones I took ACT and I think those are prevalently used. However they are all very similar and the SAT preparations will benefit anyone planning to take this type of test. Number one it lets you know what to expect. I had Cheryn help me with the first section and our combined effort only netted a 68%. I guess if you don't use it you do lose it. The practice module lets you review the topics again seeing your first selections, the function key finds the next wrong answer and lets you guess at a next choice. The exam disk lets you take it like the real thing. It keeps score and lets you know how you have done in each category. I think this one is well worth the money and wish I would have had this type of prep prior to my exams. This program will be in the library after the April Demo. We ask that you keep it no more than three days and be responsible to get it back to the Education Coordinator, so that more of our members may use it.

Bob & Cheryn Nunn

GAME TIPS

NEUROMANCER - to get all the money you need send your BAMA ID to Armitage via PAX. He'll upload $10,000 to your account and tell you to meet him in front of the Matrix restaurant. Go there and get arrested. After your trial repeat the actions. You must be carrying a little money or the court will start giving you the death penalty. This trick will only work on the first day of the game.-Norman Fair

BARD'S TALE II - The dream spell for this game is ZZGO. Using it will let you go into any dungeon you want.

EARNHEART COMPUTER REPAIR
5347 Flowering Peach
Memphis, TN 38115
(901) 366-0303
The Commodore Repair Specialist!
Also dealer for these fine lines:
Xetec - Midwest Printers
Micro Design Systems - Jiffy Dos
Now an authorized repair
center for Star Printers!!!

THANK YOU

I would like to thank Warren Sauer for his help in preparing the February issue for mailing. Also thanks to all the people who have been contributing articles to the newsletter. You are helping to make our newsletter one of the best in the country.

THANK YOU!!

Index

Columns 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, 23
Disk Order Form 3
Special Announcements 8, 10
Store Review 9
The Write Stuff Review 16
Humor 20, 26
Term Paper Preperation 22
Upgrade Your 1700 REU to 512K 24
Game Tips 13, 23